The Meaning of Life?

September always feels like the beginning of a new year, even more so than January 1st.  Although we mark that day with resolutions and retail sales, it’s still just the middle of winter with a long wait for spring.  But in September, the weather starts to change and so do we.  We anticipate (sometimes with a bit of anxiety) new academic opportunities and meeting new people.  We can also feel disoriented.  Both new and returning students will learn, in some areas, that the old rules no longer apply.  Yet, they will also be affirmed that previous lessons are the foundation for new learning.

When I began seminary many Septembers ago, a recent graduate said to me, “In the midst of all you will encounter here, remember two things.  Be and do.  Be and do.”  Over the years it has become an expanded mantra to me: “In being all I am created to be, I can do all I am called to do.”  Whether you profess to be a person of faith or not, you are on this planet for a reason.  Seeking meaning and purpose is a human instinct.  Is your purpose merely self serving, or connected to something greater than yourself?

Emory students are well known for their commitment to service and volunteerism.  In the wake of hurricanes Harvey and Irma, we are planning service trips for fall, winter and spring breaks.  We are writing checks and sending donations for relief.  In addition to this important work, this September, I am encouraging another type of reaching out within the Emory campus.  What would it look like if moved a few steps beyond our regular circle of friends?  When did you last take time to learn about someone with whom you have little in common?  We were created to be in community.  Humans thrive on connection.  One of Emory’s core values is to be a collaborative community that works for positive change. It’s how we were created to be.  What will YOU do to embody that vision and value?

Rev. Bridgette Young Ross
Dean of the Chapel and Spiritual Life

Advertisements

Eid Al-Adha— The Sequel

Eid Al-Adha is the second Eid, or religious holiday, that Muslims celebrate each year. This Eid is during the Islamic month Dul-Hijjah. During this month, Muslims from all of the world go to Mecca to complete the pilgrimage: Hajj. Eid celebrates the completion of Hajj. However, the true purpose of Eid is to honor and remember the Prophet Abraham and his son’s complete submission to God. Muslims believe that Abraham (pbuh: peace be upon him) received divine revelation from God instructing him to sacrifice his son, Ismael (pbuh). This was an immensely difficult test for Prophet Abraham (pbuh) because he loved his son dearly, but ultimately God came first. Prophet Abraham (pbuh) informed his son Ismael (pbuh) of the omen and Ismael (pbuh) did not hesitate and expressed to his father that if this was the will of God, then he is completely compliant. The wholehearted compliance of both Abraham (pbuh) and his son Ismael (pbuh) made evident the magnitude of their faith and trust in God. This concept of unconditional and devoted faith is defined in Islam as Iman, and this immense strength of Iman that Abraham (pbuh) and Ismael (pbuh)is what embodies the holiday and what Muslims every year remember and strive for. But the story doesn’t end there: Abraham (pbuh) and Ismael (pbuh) made their Iman completely evident in this test from God, and thus at the moment of sacrifice, God sent two lambs in the place of Ismael. Allah could have allowed Ismael to be sacrificed; a practice common in many different faiths, but His ultimate purpose was not to hurt the Prophet Abraham (pbuh) or his son, rather to test their devotion. This is so beautiful because it reminds us of God’s mercy and demonstrates that all that truly matters is that you fully spiritually submit to God. Iman is a fundamental basis of Islam and we are reminded of that on Eid.

Adorned in their best and brightest, Muslims attend Eid prayer. Eid day is started with a special prayer only performed on the two Eids and takes place a few hours after Fajr prayer. Muslims congregate in the mosque repeating the takbir which is a part of the special Eid prayer. They repeat the words, “Takbeer, Allahu Akbar, Allahu Akbar, La ilaaha il-lal-lahu, Allah Akbar Allahu Akbar, Wa lilAllahil hamd ” which translates to “ God is the greatest, God is the greatest, There is no one worthy of worship except God, God is the greatest, God is the greatest and to God belongs all praise. After the conclusion of the Eid prayer, Muslims usually enjoy a feast. Typically, mosques will host a potluck brunch in which families and friends gather with an array of various delicious dishes. After all our appetites are happily satisfied, the Muslims disperse to go partake in their own individual celebrations. My family visits other family and friends, sharing gifts and good wishes with everyone. The homes are filled with gleeful children who patiently wait for their Eidya: money given to teens and under on Eid. Delighted and youthful cheers accompany the chaotic exchange of small envelopes filled with dollar bills. Adolescents, toddlers, babies all receive goody bags filled with a colorful assortment of candies. Uncles, aunts, cousins and neighbors snack on homemade cookies while waiting for lunch to be prepared. Traditionally on Eid, Muslims will slaughter a lamb in memory of the Prophet Ismael and his devotion to Allah. The meat from the lamb is divided into thirds: one third for the family, another to be shared with the neighbors and the final third is to be given to the needy. In addition to giving a third of the meat to the needy, Muslims also must give Zakat, a tax which requires all Muslims to donate a specific amount of their income to the poor. Recently Muslims have performed the perfunctory tasks of slaughtering the lamb and giving Zakat virtually. Lambs can be purchased online and their meat can be sent to needy families across the globe. To still connect with the tradition, my family always serves lamb as the main dish. The remainder of the day is spent with family and friends rejoicing. Eid is a three-day long holiday, and for the remaining holiday days people attend dinners, parties, etc. It is embodied by the spirit of giving, sharing, helping and believing.

Eid translates to “celebration” in Arabic; thus the three day long period in which it lasts is full of celebratory events. During this three day period, Muslims of all cultural backgrounds are able to reconnect with Allah and remember what it means to be Muslim, to have complete faith in God. This time of spiritual reconnection and joyful celebration resonates with all Muslims. The commemoration of peaceful submission serves as an annual lesson for all Muslims, on the importance of peaceful surrender to God. Inshallah we will continue to peacefully interact and learn about Islam, during and after this holiday season! Salam and Eid Mubarak!

~Nora Elmubarak