Weddings Across Faith

Weddings across different religions share certain ceremonies despite their sometimes dramatic ideological differences. While that may seem surprising at first, upon researching the history of different wedding traditions, there are many more similarities in their spiritual significance than one might realize. I decided to research the wedding ceremonies of Christianity and Hinduism, two religions that on the surface do not seem to have a lot in common at all, and what I found surprised me.

Kanyadaan and Giving Away of the Bride: In both Hinduism and Christianity the bride is given away to the groom as a sign of good faith and as a way for the family to show their support of the union. Just as a father walks his daughter down the aisle in a Christian wedding, in a Hindu wedding, the father (or maybe both parents of the bride) place their hands between their daughter and son-in-law to symbolize the “giving away of the bride”.

Mangal Sutra/Sindoor and Exchanging of the Rings: In both traditions the bride and groom trade physical objects meant to represent emotional and spiritual connections. For Christianity the bride and groom exchange rings, chosen due to their cyclical shape representing the infinite bond the two share. There is also a scriptural reference to the ring shape because God chose a rainbow, whose complete form is a ring, as a sign of his covenant with Noah (Genesis 9:12-16). In the Hindu tradition the groom gives the bride a gold necklace with small beads and places vermillion on her forehead to signify his eternal commitment to her and the new color and dimension in her life respectively.

Red and White Dresses: The whiteness of the bride’s wedding dress in the Christian faith represents the bride’s purity and innocence in her life and her reverence to God. It also references a passage from Revelation 19:7-8 where Christ clothes his bride, the church, in his own righteousness as a garment of “fine linen, bright and clean.” Although in Hinduism the bride wears much brighter colors, usually red, it is meant to represent the same innocence and purity. The only difference here is that the red also adds an element of passion and romance.

As someone who grew up watching shows like Say Yes to the Dress on TLC, it was always difficult for me to reconcile the reality of my Hindu tradition with the Christian environment I lived in. However, after doing this research and outlining the characteristics of the ceremonies I realized that although cultures can be different on the surface, their motivations are intrinsically very human and share similar beliefs.

~Kavya Sundaram

Eid Al-Adha— The Sequel

Eid Al-Adha is the second Eid, or religious holiday, that Muslims celebrate each year. This Eid is during the Islamic month Dul-Hijjah. During this month, Muslims from all of the world go to Mecca to complete the pilgrimage: Hajj. Eid celebrates the completion of Hajj. However, the true purpose of Eid is to honor and remember the Prophet Abraham and his son’s complete submission to God. Muslims believe that Abraham (pbuh: peace be upon him) received divine revelation from God instructing him to sacrifice his son, Ismael (pbuh). This was an immensely difficult test for Prophet Abraham (pbuh) because he loved his son dearly, but ultimately God came first. Prophet Abraham (pbuh) informed his son Ismael (pbuh) of the omen and Ismael (pbuh) did not hesitate and expressed to his father that if this was the will of God, then he is completely compliant. The wholehearted compliance of both Abraham (pbuh) and his son Ismael (pbuh) made evident the magnitude of their faith and trust in God. This concept of unconditional and devoted faith is defined in Islam as Iman, and this immense strength of Iman that Abraham (pbuh) and Ismael (pbuh)is what embodies the holiday and what Muslims every year remember and strive for. But the story doesn’t end there: Abraham (pbuh) and Ismael (pbuh) made their Iman completely evident in this test from God, and thus at the moment of sacrifice, God sent two lambs in the place of Ismael. Allah could have allowed Ismael to be sacrificed; a practice common in many different faiths, but His ultimate purpose was not to hurt the Prophet Abraham (pbuh) or his son, rather to test their devotion. This is so beautiful because it reminds us of God’s mercy and demonstrates that all that truly matters is that you fully spiritually submit to God. Iman is a fundamental basis of Islam and we are reminded of that on Eid.

Adorned in their best and brightest, Muslims attend Eid prayer. Eid day is started with a special prayer only performed on the two Eids and takes place a few hours after Fajr prayer. Muslims congregate in the mosque repeating the takbir which is a part of the special Eid prayer. They repeat the words, “Takbeer, Allahu Akbar, Allahu Akbar, La ilaaha il-lal-lahu, Allah Akbar Allahu Akbar, Wa lilAllahil hamd ” which translates to “ God is the greatest, God is the greatest, There is no one worthy of worship except God, God is the greatest, God is the greatest and to God belongs all praise. After the conclusion of the Eid prayer, Muslims usually enjoy a feast. Typically, mosques will host a potluck brunch in which families and friends gather with an array of various delicious dishes. After all our appetites are happily satisfied, the Muslims disperse to go partake in their own individual celebrations. My family visits other family and friends, sharing gifts and good wishes with everyone. The homes are filled with gleeful children who patiently wait for their Eidya: money given to teens and under on Eid. Delighted and youthful cheers accompany the chaotic exchange of small envelopes filled with dollar bills. Adolescents, toddlers, babies all receive goody bags filled with a colorful assortment of candies. Uncles, aunts, cousins and neighbors snack on homemade cookies while waiting for lunch to be prepared. Traditionally on Eid, Muslims will slaughter a lamb in memory of the Prophet Ismael and his devotion to Allah. The meat from the lamb is divided into thirds: one third for the family, another to be shared with the neighbors and the final third is to be given to the needy. In addition to giving a third of the meat to the needy, Muslims also must give Zakat, a tax which requires all Muslims to donate a specific amount of their income to the poor. Recently Muslims have performed the perfunctory tasks of slaughtering the lamb and giving Zakat virtually. Lambs can be purchased online and their meat can be sent to needy families across the globe. To still connect with the tradition, my family always serves lamb as the main dish. The remainder of the day is spent with family and friends rejoicing. Eid is a three-day long holiday, and for the remaining holiday days people attend dinners, parties, etc. It is embodied by the spirit of giving, sharing, helping and believing.

Eid translates to “celebration” in Arabic; thus the three day long period in which it lasts is full of celebratory events. During this three day period, Muslims of all cultural backgrounds are able to reconnect with Allah and remember what it means to be Muslim, to have complete faith in God. This time of spiritual reconnection and joyful celebration resonates with all Muslims. The commemoration of peaceful submission serves as an annual lesson for all Muslims, on the importance of peaceful surrender to God. Inshallah we will continue to peacefully interact and learn about Islam, during and after this holiday season! Salam and Eid Mubarak!

~Nora Elmubarak