5 Practical Steps to a Better You This Rosh Hashana

It’s that time of year again–everyone is optimistic at the endless prospects and opportunities of a new beginning. This lasts until we slowly begin to acknowledge our inability to commit to half of the things we planned on, dreadfully realizing the inevitable stress to come, by the third week of school. The rest of the semester isn’t looking too bright…

So how can we momentarily take a step back from our labs, papers, and pop quizzes and appreciate the unique opportunity we’ve been given that is the New Year? How do we recognize that the beginning of the school year isn’t only about making the most “ideal” schedule or finding the best shortcuts to class? Rather, it’s about working on ourselves and establishing goals and values to set for the year.

Introducing, Rosh Hashana.

Rosh, or head, and Hashana, the year, literally means the head, or beginning, of the year. This is the Jewish New Year. The holiday typically falls on the first two days of the Jewish month of Tishrei and is followed by a 10-day period of prayer, repentance, and self-reflection on the past year which culminates on the fast day of Yom Kippur, our Day of Atonement and the holiest day of the Jewish year.

Now, while some might dread the long, tedious hours of sitting at their respective synagogues, counting down the pages of the Machzor, or prayer book used on the high holidays, others welcome this opportunity for self-reflection and awareness on how they acted the past year and how they’d like to start acting in the upcoming year. The beauty of this holiday is its significant focus on individual growth and self-awareness. The way we act and goals we make for ourselves at this critical time will set the tone for the entire year.

As with many things in Judaism, there are specific steps to the way we should repent–ask God for forgiveness–and begin to work on improving ourselves for the upcoming year. Here is a list of 5 practical ways we can all get closer to the best versions of ourselves this year.

  1. Don’t Push it Off

You’re never going to find the perfect time to get rid of a bad habit. Don’t wait for some magical sign to get you started. Don’t wait until you’re at a low point in your life. Start today.

  1. Baby Steps

 Don’t try to change too many things at once. When we take steps that are too large, we end up falling backwards. Work on one goal at a time as slowly as needed. It’s better to accomplish a goal slowly and confidently rather than sloppily and half-heartedly. You’ll most likely feel more accomplished knowing that you were thorough and took your time.

  1. List Your Goals

            Write down goals for the week, month, and year. This will give you a daily reminder of what you should be working on. Once you write things down, it becomes clearer what you need to work on.

  1. Talk to Someone

Let someone know that you’re trying to change. It’ll keep you accountable and motivated and provide you with the support you need.

  1. Eyes on the Prize

Stay focused on your goal. But, most importantly, reward yourself when you see a change. Personal growth is really difficult. We’re all pretty used to the way we’re wired and to change that, even a little, requires a lot of patience, discipline, and self-awareness. Give yourself a pat on the back when you feel that you accomplished a goal for a job well done!

So, here it is. 5 concrete methods for self-improvement and growth. Try to think about these things and reflect on the kind of person you want to be and the year you’d like to have. Even though GPAs and test scores are important to a successful college experience, self-reflection and personal growth are crucial for a meaningful life.

 

Shana Tova and Happy New Year!

http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/Fall_Holidays/Rosh_Hashannah/rosh_hashannah.htm

http://www.aish.com/h/hh/rh/guide/7-Tips-for-Rosh-Hashanah.html?s=mpw

Becca Sirota and Jessica Nooriel

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Just Because You Disagree With Me Doesn’t Give Me The Right To Think You’re Stupid

I may not agree with what you believe, but I will fight for your right to believe it.

This past weekend, I attended the Islamic Society of North America convention along with 30 other emerging religious leaders. Our group convened as part of the Shoulder to Shoulder campaign, an interfaith organization dedicated to ending anti-Muslim sentiment. While I’ve always maintained a commitment to religious diversity in my work and education, this was the first time I was the religious minority. But ideologically, I still found myself comfortable in the majority as session after session confronted social justice issues important to the Muslim community.

Throughout the weekend as I listened to stories about what it means to be a Muslim-American, I thought harder about what it means to fight for someone else’s right to believe. In our interreligious circles we talk about going beyond tolerance to embrace and engage those who are different, and ultimately to respect and understand their belief system or worldview.

But what happens when someone’s belief system and worldview is so fundamentally different than my own? What if it contradicts my Truth, my understanding of justice, or my understanding of God’s will? Am I still called to embrace and engage them, respect and learn from them?

I say yes. Engagement doesn’t mean endorsement.

On a campus like Emory, we live in a progressive, forward-thinking bubble. I’ve seen it amongst many of my classmates in the Candler School of Theology. The classrooms we inhabit and our educational circles become safe places to be liberal, idealistic, and sometimes even a little radical. When we do so, our conversations become “us,” the enlightened ones, against “them,” the unenlightened.

But what happens when we go back out into the world, beyond our bubble, only to be confronted with the harsh reality of hate, or worse – ambivalence? Our socially engaged selves look upon our opponents as less enlightened than we are, more biased, less open minded. less capable of accepting others. They aren’t worth engaging, they aren’t worthy of our understanding, and we can barely even tolerate them on our Facebook feeds.

“We think our enemies are idiots, and that’s a problem,” writes Adam Waytz of Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Business. In his Washington Post article, Waytz writes about the “lesser minds problem.” In short, Waytz argues that “The greatest journey that no amount of technology can ever overcome is one of psychological distance—the distance between two minds.” The problem is that when we see others as mindless, we dehumanize them.

Ultimately, we love diversity that agrees with us. Though my non-Christian friends might have a different name for God or different ideas about the significance of Jesus or pray differently, we largely agree ideologically because we are bred in the same liberal academic environment. It’s okay that you don’t look like me, dress like me, pray like me, or think about God like me…but once you start to disagree with me on same-sex marriage, immigration, Israel/Palestine, or other social justice issues, I no longer find you worthy of my time.

We lose out on true ideological diversity if we try to quiet the voices that don’t believe the “right way.” Doing so violates the ethics of a diverse community. I suggest that at Emory we create safe spaces where we can meet each other across the most extreme lines: beyond religious identity, beyond race, ethnicity, gender, or sexual orientation. I suggest that we meet in a place where we put humanity above ideology.

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,

there is a field. I’ll meet you there.

When the soul lies down in that grass,

the world is too full to talk about.

Ideas, language, even the phrase “each other” doesn’t make any sense.

-Rumi

 

So, where can we meet?

~~Allison Purves

Ganesh Chaturthi

Ganesh Chaturthi, or Vinayaka Chaturthi, is a Hindu festival celebrating the birthday of the god, Ganesh. Ganesh is believed by followers to be the elephant-headed son of Lord Shiva, the god of destruction. This year, Ganesh Chaturthi will be observed on September 17th, when Hindus worldwide will celebrate by worshipping Lord Ganesha. Specifically, many participate in creating elaborate, life-size clay models of the elephant-headed god a few months prior to the festival. These clay models of Ganesha are then involved in prayer rituals during the celebration, as they are believed to embody the deity himself. On the eleventh day of the festival, the clay models are carried through the streets and dropped into a river to send Ganesh back to his home in the mountains of Kailash. This act is done to rid devotees of bad omens. Other aspects of the celebration involve preparing feasts and decorating the home. Hindus often pray to Ganesha at the beginning of an activity, as he is believed to be the remover of obstacles. For example, followers pray to Ganesha at the start of their prayer, in the mornings, and at the start of the school year. Wishing everyone a happy Ganesh Chaturthi this week!

– Snehaja Yadlapati

Shubh Krishna Janmashtami at Emory

Shubh Krishna Janmashtami (Happy Janmashtami)! Krishna Janmashtami, also known as Gokulashtami, is the celebration of the birth of Krishna. Krishna is the eighth incarnation of Lord Vishnu, and is also known as Murali, Govinda, Gopala, and one hundred other names. Krishna Janmashtami is celebrated on the eighth day of the sixth month of the Hindu calendar. This year, that day will be Saturday, September 5. Hindus all across the world (and especially in India) celebrate Krishna Janmashtami by visiting temples and performing a wide range of rituals that vary depending on the region. In addition, many Hindus also fast on Krishna Janmashtami until midnight, when it is believed that Krishna was born. Two rituals unique to Krishna Janmashtami are Rasa lila and Dahi Handi. Rasa lila is a dance that depicts life of Krishna and is performed primarily in the cities of Mathura and Vrindavan, and in parts of the state of Manipur (in India). Dahi Handi is a ritual in which teams of men create human towers and pyramids in order to break a high-hanging pot of dahi (yogurt). The Dahi Handi ritual is performed across India, but is primarily performed in the state of Maharashtra and its capital city of Bombay. In the state of Tamil Nadu, floors are decorated with kolams, patterns made with rice batter, and footprints are drawn from the thresholds of houses to the temple. Shubh Krishna Janmashtami!

Vivek Sawhney

 

Religion: The Right to be More Than What We Are Alone

It should be an interesting few weeks in the news cycle. I imagine that this story will keep some folks up at night and others will sleep easier. Regardless of one’s opinion of the controversy, which side they take, or what they are willing to rally for the question we are going to have to wonder is, how far can religion itself carry the ball in the courts of the government. I am careful not to say the courts of the people since the people of the judicial branch, without public involvement, make the decisions on this subject.

The case of Kim Davis has continued on as the Kentucky woman refuses to perform her duties as a County Clerk. While claiming religious liberty she is gaining support of those whose values lie in their religious beliefs to a point that they would stand against perceived injustices from the government. At the same time those who support the Supreme Court Decision for right to equal marital opportunity are standing beside their own value system. What will happen by in large will be a conversation of ideas that talk past one another without much hearing going on. The case for religious liberty has the potential though to be more than a smattering of terse sayings and phrases shouted at the top of one’s lungs. Instead it stands as a bastion for two seemingly oppositional ideas to be heard in public by both sides and a dialogue pursued. While the Supreme Court has delivered marital rights to the LGBT community it is clear that equal rights for marriage do not mean equality.

A fundamental human notion has been missed once again, alongside racism and other mores of the human experience. The loss of equanimity, not only equality, has pervaded the social consciousness to the point that many meaningful conversations across perceived boundaries have become not only burdensome, but also brutal. They result in public shame, public abuse, public hate, and public violence because of the loss of composure over one’s self. Composure and dedication to respecting the identity, the core being of a person has been given up for the flash and the bang. I am convinced, however, that we are not being tricked. My hunch is that there are many more conversations happening, relationships being developed, and social interactions forever changed by the new understandings that are going unnoticed.

Our greatest enemy in the midst of controversy is not the opposition. No, the “opposition” is not our neighbor, brother, sister, and sibling. They are the heart and soul of what makes cases like religious liberty meaningful and valuable, on both sides. No, I think that our greatest feat to overcome is the tendency to buy into the limit of information as that which is the limit to what it applicable and possible to accomplish. If media has the tendency to observe and report solely or predominantly on the vandals in Ferguson, and that is what the masses believe to be the information, then the media has failed the people as a resource for the people to be active citizens. Religious liberty as well as race, economics, class, non-binary gender identity, and many more identities deserve much more than the limits that media impose upon its viewers.

The masses, you and I, must realize that we are more than a paycheck. We are leaders in our own lives and chances are we are authors of truth and limitless creative possibility in the lives of one another. Social issues are not simply social issues because a news anchor decided that it was a story. Social issues are more than the utility of a mogul to satisfy his or her own attention. When Religious Liberty or LGBT Rights “go on trial” so also will all other matters that citizens know are meaningful to them, inherently and without propagation from the media. How we choose to proceed in public, whether it is to invest in one another or investigate against one another will continue to determine how the public, you and I, choose to engage in healthy or unhealthy conflict. Religion, at its core, is not meant to carry our arguments in courts as wondered in the beginning of this post. Instead it is a utility to be used to form relationships, break down barriers, and ultimately value the uniqueness of the transcendent and divine that dwells in each of us. Hopefully, we as a mass can be encouraged to not give up hope, to not draw swords on our posters, but instead drop our pickets and embrace one another for our differences.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/04/us/kim-davis-same-sex-marriage.html?_r=0

Kevin Crawford